<img height="1" width="1" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=316375289827066&amp;ev=PageView &amp;noscript=1">

Recognizing National Diabetes Awareness Month

Apicha Community Health Center Nov 05, 2019  

Apicha CHC - iStock

November is National Diabetes Awareness Month, and aims to spread awareness and knowledge about diabetes.

Information for this post derived from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.

Diabetes can affect anyone. As of 2015, 30.3 million people in the United States, or 9.4 percent of the population, had diabetes. More than 1 in 4 of them didn’t know they had the disease. Diabetes affects 1 in 4 people over the age of 65, and about 90-95 percent of cases in adults are type 2 diabetes.

What is diabetes?

Diabetes is a disease that occurs when your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high. Blood glucose is the body's main source of energy and comes from the food we eat. Insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas (an organ in your body), helps glucose from food get into your cells to be used for energy. Sometimes your body doesn’t make enough—or any—insulin or doesn’t use insulin well. Glucose then stays in your blood and doesn’t reach your cells.

Apicha CHC - iStock

Different types of diabetes

There are several different types of diabetes, although the most commonly know are type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes.

Type 1 diabetes means your body does not produce any insulin. Your immune system attacks and destroys the cells in your pancreas that make insulin. Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and young adults, although it can appear at any age. People with type 1 diabetes need to take insulin every day to stay alive.

Type 2 diabetes is a little different. If you have type 2 diabetes, your body does not make or use insulin well. You can develop type 2 diabetes at any age, even during childhood. However, this type of diabetes occurs most often in middle-aged and older people.

Type 2 is the most common type of diabetes. You are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes if you have a family history of diabetes, are overweight, or are over age 45. Physical inactivity, race, and certain health problems also affect your chances of developing type 2 diabetes. A history of gestational diabetes is a risk factor for women. Type 2 diabetes can prevented or delayed by losing weight if you are overweight, being active for 30 minutes most days of the week, and following a reduced-calorie eating plan.

Gestational diabetes occurs when a woman is pregnant.  Generally speaking, this type of diabetes goes away after the baby is born. However, if you’ve had gestational diabetes, you have a greater chance of developing type 2 diabetes later in life. Sometimes diabetes diagnosed during pregnancy is actually type 2 diabetes.

Diabetes can lead to other health problems

Over time, having diabetes can lead to other health problems -- especially if it goes untreated. The following health issues can occur:

  • heart disease
  • stroke
  • kidney disease
  • eye problems
  • dental disease
  • nerve damage
  • foot problems
Apicha CHC - iStock
Who does diabetes affect?

In 2015, 30.3 million Americans, or 9.4% of the population, had diabetes. Of the 30.3 million adults with diabetes, 23.1 million were diagnosed, and 7.2 million were undiagnosed. Each year, 1.5 million Americans are diagnosed with diabetes. Diabetes affects the following ethnic groups:

  • 7.4% of non-Hispanic whites
  • 8.0% of Asian Americans
  • 12.1% of Hispanics
  • 12.7% of non-Hispanic blacks
  • 15.1% of American Indians/Alaskan Natives
Diabetes remains the 7th leading cause of death in the United States in 2015, with 79,535 death certificates listing it as the underlying cause of death, and a total of 252,806 death certificates listing diabetes as an underlying or contributing cause of death.

Managing & treating diabetes

Apicha CHC - iStock

If you have diabetes, you can still live a normal and healthy life through proper treatment. Most individuals who have diabetes take insulin or other diabetic medicines. The medicine you take depends on the type of diabetes you have to manage your blood sugar levels. However, maintaining a healthy diet and active lifestyle can also help manage diabetes.

Individuals with type 1 diabetes must take insulin, because their bodies do not produce the hormone. Insulin is typically taken multiple times a day and can be administered via injection or using an insulin pump. 

Individuals with type 2 diabetes can manage their disease by making health food choices and having an active lifestyle. Medication is sometimes required for this type of diabetes, but it varies per person. 

How Apicha CHC can help you

Apicha CHC can help you manage and treat your diabetes with the help of providers, case managers, and a registered dietitian. Our in-house pharmacy is also available to patients so they can easily access their medication and prescriptions. 

 


Ready to take action about your health?
 request an appointment

Subscribe For Updates

What's the Difference Between Nonbinary & Genderqueer?

What's the Difference Between Nonbinary & Genderqueer?

Understanding different identities can be difficult, but it's also incredibly important. And for...
Early Signs of HIV

Early Signs of HIV

Early HIV is the beginning stage of HIV disease, right after HIV infection occurs.
How to Support Someone Who is Transitioning

How to Support Someone Who is Transitioning

Making the choice to transition is a big milestone. Whether it’s your partner, a friend, or anyone...
Gay Sex & Primary Care: What You Need To Know

Gay Sex & Primary Care: What You Need To Know

  Some of the many ways Apicha Community Health Center (CHC) has served New York City’s LGBT...
Transgender Sexual Health Guide: Safer Sex

Transgender Sexual Health Guide: Safer Sex

When it comes to sex, there’s a serious lack of resources available to transgender people that...
Recognizing World AIDS Day 2021

Recognizing World AIDS Day 2021

Every year, on December 1, people worldwide commemorate World Aids Day. This is a dedicated day to...
Celebrating PrEP Aware Week 2021

Celebrating PrEP Aware Week 2021

This year, from October 25 to October 31, 2021 people worldwide will be celebrating the third...
First Openly Trans and Female Four-Star Officer and Admiral of the USPHS Commissioned Corps

First Openly Trans and Female Four-Star Officer and Admiral of the USPHS Commissioned Corps

On Tuesday, October 9, 2021, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) made history by...
What's on the Ballot? General Election November 2021

What's on the Ballot? General Election November 2021

November is coming up, which means it's voting season! Voting is an essential part of every...